Welcome to our Family!

Our Family Serving Yours!

Together we can SOD the Metroplex one pallet at a time!

About Us

Our History

Buena Vista Turf Farm has been growing and delivering turf grass to the Dallas / Ft.Worth area since 1994. 


Buena Vista provides premium sod to Landscape Contractors, Residential and Commercial Builders, Homeowners and Highway Construction Contractors. 


Buena Vista Turf Farm has two farms totaling 1,565 acres, with over 1,000 acres of sod currently in production

Varieties of Turfgrass Sold

419 Tif Bermuda

An improved hybrid Bermuda with excellent wear tolerance for 

high traffic areas.

Characteristics: 

Hot Weather Tolerance: Excellent

Cold Weather Tolerance: Good

Shade Tolerance: Low

Drought Resistance: Excellent

Recovery from Injury: Fair 

Winter Color: Dormant

Mowing Height: 1/2" to 1" 

Use: Home lawns, Fairways, Tees, Sports Field

Buildings & Park Areas

Texture: Medium Fine 

 

U3 Bermuda

This is a hybrid Bermuda grass that can be established 

from seed or sod. 

Characteristics:

Hot Weather Tolerance: Excellent

Cold Weather Tolerance: Excellent

Shade Tolerance: Low

Drought Resistance: Excellent

Recovery from Injury: Excellent

Winter Color: Dormant

Mowing Height: 1" to 1 1/2"

Use: Home lawns, Golf Course Roughs, Commercial 

Buildings & Park Areas

Texture: Medium

Turf Tips

When ordering sod for next day service, please make sure that you have your orders in our office by 10am the morning before your expected delivery date. To ensure a specific delivery date, we recommend that you place orders several days or even weeks in advance. You will need the following information when placing your order:


Delivery Address - House or building number and street, City, Mapsco page & grid (if not in Mapsco we will need a map with noted drop site on it)

Spotting directions - Example: front yard, back yard, full sod which is front/back/sides, or on driveway. Or whatever specific directions describe your project.

Amount of Sod - Convert your footage to square yards. We do only deliver in full pallets. Our office personnel will be glad to help with this.

Variety of Sod

Contact name & phone number

Special notes - Example: if it was a gated community we would need to make special delivery arrangements.

Employment Opportunity

Drop us a line!

We are always looking for good people. Come Join our team!

Welcome to the employment page.  We are always looking for good people.   Please send us a note if you are looking for a great place to work.  


We are currently looking for drivers

Buena Vista Sod

300 Oak Trail, Suite 100, Garland, TX 75043, US

(972) 226-8873

Hours

Monday - Friday: 9am - 5pm

Saturday: By appointment

Sunday: Closed

Site Content

419 Tif Bermuda

An improved hybrid Bermuda with excellent wear tolerance for 

high traffic areas.

Characteristics: 

Hot Weather Tolerance: Excellent

Cold Weather Tolerance: Good

Shade Tolerance: Low

Drought Resistance: Excellent

Recovery from Injury: Fair 

Winter Color: Dormant

Mowing Height: 1/2" to 1" 

Use: Home lawns, Fairways, Tees, Sports Field

Buildings & Park Areas

Texture: Medium Fine 

U3 Bermuda

This is a hybrid Bermuda grass that can be established 

from seed or sod. 

Characteristics:

Hot Weather Tolerance: Excellent

Cold Weather Tolerance: Excellent

Shade Tolerance: Low

Drought Resistance: Excellent

Recovery from Injury: Excellent

Winter Color: Dormant

Mowing Height: 1" to 1 1/2"

Use: Home lawns, Golf Course Roughs, Commercial 

Buildings & Park Areas

Texture: Medium

Small Rolls

Pallets are 56 yds (504) sq. ft. per Truck load.




Big Rolls

Big Rolls are 45 yds. (405 sq. ft.) 26 Big Rolls per 

Truck load

Share the big news

Have you opened a new location, redesigned your shop, or added a new product or service? Don't keep it to yourself, let folks know.

Slabs

Pallets are 56 yds. (504 sq. ft.) 20 pallets per

Truck load

Site Content

Watering Tips

WATERING INSTRUCTIONS Sod, Trees & Shrubs 

 

Your new lawn and landscape represents an investment which can reap big dividends if cared for properly.  Grass, trees and shrubs will make your home more attractive and enjoyable.  In addition, these improvements will increase your property value proportionately more than any other home improvement.  However, your landscape will not survive, and cannot be warranted, if not given the appropriate attention and climatic conditions.  These instructions have been provided to help you care for your investment. 

 

Sod Installed in Summer 

 

As one might expect, improper watering practices account for almost all of the problems in establishing a new lawn.  Immediately after installation apply enough water to saturate the ground several inches below the sod pad.  Examine the grass frequently to make sure the soil is wet.  The sod pad must not be allowed to become dry!  Supplemental irrigation is usually required at least once a day.  Continue this procedure until the sod has rooted into the soil, which usually occurs within 1 to 2 weeks.  For the next 3 to 4 weeks gradually lengthen the time between waterings from once every other day to once every 4 to 5 days. 

 

Do not be alarmed if the grass turns yellow or brown in the first few days after installation.  It is not abnormal for newly planted sod to suffer shock.  It will regain its green color given sufficient time and water. 

 

An established yard should only be watered when the grass blades show signs of "visual wilt."  When this occurs, the lawn should be soaked completely to a depth of 6 inches.  Apply water only as fast as it can absorb into the soil.  In general, a mature lawn will require a deep soaking every 5 to 6 days.  Frequent watering tends to encourage a shallow root system, which makes the lawn susceptible to injury. 

 

Sod Installed in Winter 

 

Bermuda grass installed in the dormant season will survive in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area if cared for properly.  Watering procedures for the first 3 or 4 days after installation are the same when the grass is dormant as in the summer.  Thereafter, watering every other day is usually adequate, until the grass begins to root.  The amount of root growth will vary depending upon the temperature.  At this point the watering frequency may gradually be reduced over a 3 to 4 week period.  Mature grass requires moisture once a week even in the winter.  Remember that cold weather by itself will not kill bermuda grass in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area.  However, freezing temperatures combined with desiccation (lack of water) can severely injure or kill any lawn. 

 

Grass installed during the winter often does not break dormancy as early in the spring as established turf.  It may not start turning green until May, and provide a solid turf until June. 

 

Trees and Shrubs Installed in Summer 

 

Trees and shrubs should be thoroughly soaked to the bottom of the root ball when installed (tree balls are approximately 3 feet deep, shrub roots are approximately 1 foot deep).  Thereafter, the soil should be kept moist but not constantly wet.  Unlike grass, trees and shrubs must be allowed to dry out slightly so the roots will not be suffocated.  They should be examined daily and watered deeply if the soil is dry.  In Summer, watering is usually required every 2 to 3 days.  Continue this procedure until the roots begin to grow into the soil (1 to 2 weeks for shrubs and 2 to 4 weeks for trees).  Then gradually reduce the watering frequency over a 4 week period.  Mature trees and shrubs require a deep watering once a week. 

 

Trees and Shrubs Installed in Winter 

 

Water requirements for trees and shrubs installed in the winter are similar to those in summer, except that the soil does not dry out as quickly.  After the initial soaking, watering is usually required twice a week for the first 2 to 3 weeks.  Be sure the ground has had a chance to dry slightly before watering again.  Mature trees and shrubs require a deep soaking once a week in the winter. 

 

The trees and shrubs in your landscape are hardy for this area.  However, unusually cold temperatures (below 20 degrees) or extended periods below freezing can injure or kill your landscape.  Trees and shrubs should be watered well before the onset of a freeze.  Small shrubs should be covered with plastic. 

 

REMEMBER Don't forget to water trees, shrubs and grass in the parkway and on the sides of the house, as these areas are easily neglected. 

 

A little bit of attention to your landscape can pay big dividends and help make your neighborhood a beautiful place to live. 

 

    

LUSH LAWNS LANDSCAPE, INC. MAINTENANCE CALENDAR 

 

 

JANUARY Mow or spray winter weeds. Cultivate annuals once lightly. Weed all beds once. Prune trees (major Pruning). Spray dormant oil on red oak, pecan, crabapple, euonymus, holly, camellia, and any other plants subject to scale insect damage. Fertilize pansies and other winter annuals. 

 

FEBRUARY Mow or spray winter weeds. Lightly Cultivate annual beds. Weed all beds. Prune trees (major pruning). Prune roses around Feb. 22. Fertilize pansies and other winter annuals. 

 

MARCH Scalp all grass areas (remove clippings). In a cold spring, do this in April. Cultivate all newly planted beds and annual beds once the last week this month. Weed all beds. Spraying isn't needed unless we have an early spring, then follow April's schedule. Also watch for aphids on pyracantha, ivy, pittosporum and photinia. Mow groundcover beds to approx. 3" (Asian jasmine, liriope, ophiopogon, euonymus colorata, and vinca). Fertilize all planting areas (except azaleas) and grass (1st Major Fertilization). Apply Preemergent Herbicides. Shift or move any wrong color azaleas while they are in bloom. 

 

APRIL Mow once per week, catching clippings. Cultivate (lightly fork) all newly planted areas and annuals every other week. Prune azaleas lightly after they have bloomed. Spray pyracantha and cotoneaster while in bloom for fireblight. Watch for fungus on leaves of Indian hawthorn and fungus circles on St. Augustine grass. Watch for aphids on new growth of shrubs, ivy and ranunculus. Watch for snails, pill bugs, cutworms, squash bugs, loopers and army worms. Fertilize azaleas after blooming; this is the most important time. Mulch azaleas and camelia. Shift or move any wrong color azaleas while they are in bloom. 

 

MAY Mow once per week, catching clippings. Cultivate (lightly fork) all newly planted areas and annuals every other week. Spray for any insect or disease problems. Watch for mildew on crape myrtles, bagworms on conifers, whitefly on gardenias and ligustrum, aphids on new growth of everything. Plant summer annuals: Sun-- lantana, verbena, portulaca, periwinkle, zinnia, marigold, copperleaf. Shade -- caladium, begonia, impatiens, coleus, browallia. 

 

JUNE Mow once per week, catching clippings. Cultivate (lightly fork) all newly planted areas and annuals. Prune out all dead or diseased wood. Spray for insect or disease problems. Fertilize lawns and all planting areas except azaleas (2nd Major Fertilization); also fertilize mums and pinch out buds. Mulch roses. Watch for powdery mildew on crape myrtle, roses and photinia. 

 

JULY Mow once per week, catching clippings; raise mowing height during hot weather. Deep Water during the hot months. Cultivate (lightly fork) all newly planted areas and annuals. Prune all dead or diseased wood. Spray for any chinch bugs in lawns, and red spider on marigolds, junipers and tomatoes. Red spiders are usually at their peak during the hot, dry months. 

 

AUGUST Mow once per week, catching clippings. Cultivate (lightly fork) all newly planted areas and annuals. Prune all dead or diseased wood. Light tipping of summer growth at this time will promote a compact burst of fall growth in Sept. and Oct. Spray chinch bugs in St. Augustine lawns. Red spiders are at their peak this month. Apply preventative treatment for grub worms. Sow bluebonnet seeds. Plant zinnias and marigolds for fall color. Stop pinching chrysanthemums the first of the month. 

 

SEPTEMBER Mow once per week, catching clippings. Cultivate all newly planted areas every two weeks. (Not azalea beds). Prune all dead or diseased wood. Spray for insect or disease problems. Watch for fungus in St. Augustine lawns. Preventative treatment for grub worms is desirable in St. Augustine lawns if not done in the previous month. Apply preemergent herbicide for winter weeds. Early September is last chance to Seed or Hydromulch Bermuda. Alternate choice is cool season grass (fescue, rye, bluegrass) especially in shady area. 

 

OCTOBER Mow once per week, catching clippings. Cultivate all newly planted areas every two weeks. Prune all dead or diseased wood. Spray loquats while in bloom for fireblight. Fertilize all planting beds (except azaleas) and lawns (3rd Major Fertilization). Pull up spent annuals, cut off tops of spent perennials. Plant pansies, snapdragons, wall flowers, calendulas. Divide perennials. Indoor Bulb Forcing should be done. 

 

NOVEMBER Mow once per week until grass goes dormant. Cultivate newly planted areas and annuals once. Remove dead or diseased leaves and wood weekly by pick pruning. Spray loquats while in bloom for fireblight. Watch for fungus in lawns of St. Augustine grass. Fertilize pansies or other winter annuals. Begin major tree Pruning. 

 

DECEMBER Do not Mow unless winter weeds appear. Hand Water annuals and new plants. Cultivate annuals only. Major Pruning of trees should be done. Spray dormant oil on red oaks, crabapples and camellias. Fertilize pansies and other winter annuals.

INSECT & DISEASE SPRAY CHART 

 

DISEASES   SOLUTION        FIREBLIGHT   Spray Streptomycin when plant is in 100% bloom and again 1 week      later. 

 

FUNGAL LEAF SPOT  Spray Benomyl, Zineb or Captan as needed. 

 

BACTERIAL LEAF SPOT Spray Streptomycin as needed. 

 

BLACK SPOT   Spray Benomyl and Phaltan every two weeks, alternating chemicals. 

 

LAWN FUNGUS  Spray Daconil 2787, Terraclor or Benomyl  at 7-10 day untervals. 

 

POWDERY MILDEW  Spray Benomyl or Actidione PM at 7-10 day intervals. 

 

INSECTS & PESTS  SOLUTION        APHIDS   Spray Malathion or Dursban as needed. 

 

ARMY WORMS   Apply Orthene or Bacillus Thuringiensis as needed. 

 

ASPS    Spray Dursban as needed. 

 

BAGWORMS   Spray with Orthene, Bacillus Thuringiensis or Taxaphene. Pull off the      bags by hand. 

 

BORERS   Apply Diazinon, Malathion or Lindane full strength into holes with      syringe or eye dropper. Seal holes up with putty. Spray trunks with     Lindane from May to Sept., once per month. 

 

CATERPILLARS  Apply Diazinon, Bacillus Thuringiensis, Malathion or Orthene. 

 

CHIGGERS   Apply Sulphur Powder to prevent, Aloe Vera or Nail Polish to stop     the sting. 

 

CHINCH BUGS   Spray Dursban or Diazinon as needed. 

 

CROWN GALL   No sure cure. Keep plants healthy as possible. 

 

CUTWORMS   Apply Orthene or Bacillus Thuringiensis as needed. 

 

EARWIGS   Control with Sevin Dust. 

 

GRUB WORMS   Apply Granular form of Diazinon in August. 

 

LACEBUGS   Spray with Orthene, Diazinon or Malathion. 

 

LEAFHOPPERS   Spray with Orthene, Diazinon or Malathion. 

 

LEAF MINERS   Spray with Orthene or Isotox as needed and remove the affected leaves. 

 

MEALYBUGS   Spray with Orthene, Diazinon or Malathion. 


 

 

 

INSECTS & PESTS  SOLUTION        

 

NEMATODES   Apply a Granular or Liquid Nematicide as needed. 

 

RED SPIDER (Spider Mites) Spray Kelthane in 3 applications at 7- day intervals. 

 

SCALE    Spray dormant oil in January or February and follow up with Malathion     or Orthene at green up. 

 

SLUG AND SNAILS  Apply Slug Bait, Zectran or Que Bane to the soil around the plants. 

 

THRIPS    Spray Orthene, Diazinon or Malathion. 

 

WHITEFLIES   Spray Malathion or Isotox in 3 applications at 7- day intervals. 

 

 

VERY IMPORTANT:  ALWAYS FOLLOW LABEL INSTRUCTIONS AND UPDATE THIS CHART                             YEARLY DUE TO PRODUCT CHANGES AND GOVERNMENT                RESTRICTIONS. USE A WETTING AGENT OR SPREADER STICKER                            TO MAKE CHEMICAL ADHERE.

How to Measure For Sod

There are different shapes of areas to measure with different methods to measure them by.  Measure the areas in which you intend to lay sod only.  The following formulas will help you convert to the square footage that you will need for your sod project. 

 

 

  SQUARE / RECTANGLE   A= Length x Width 

 

Example:  The square’s or the rectangle’s base is 10 feet and the height is 12 feet. 

 

A= 10 x 12 A= 120 square feet 

 

   CIRCLE   A= 3.14 x r2 

Example:  The circle’s radius (r) is 10 feet.  Multiply the known 3.14 by the radium squared. 

A= 3.14 x 10 x 10 A= 3.14 x 100 A= 314 square feet 

 

 TRIANGLE   A= Base x Height 

Example:  The triangle’s base is 10 feet and the height (base to point) is 20 feet. 

A= 10 x 20   A= 200               2                 2 A= 100 square feet 

 

 

FREE FORM AREAS 

 

These areas are a bit tricky to measure.  It’s best to break these areas down as squares, rectangles, circles & triangles.  Calculate each form and then add your square feet together for an overall calculation. 

 

 

Time to Calculate your total square yards needed: 

 

After getting your square feet total divide it by nine and this will be how many square yards you need to cover your sod project.   Example:  1,512 sq. ft divided by 9 = 168 square yards This figure can then be calculated into how many pallets you will need to order. 

 

It’s always wise to round up and maybe add 5% to your calculations to compensate for measuring and estimation errors and to make sure you have enough to cover odd angles and cuts. 

 You are now ready to contact Buena Vista Turf Farm to place your order for sod!

Big Roll Installation Guide

Instructions for printing the following two pages as a two-sided brochure:

 

 

The “Big Roll Installation Guide” is offered in three versions: 1) High-resolution, full-color version members can present to their commercial printing company to produce larger quantities 2) Low-resolution version that will produce a quality copy from home laser and inkjet printers 3) Low-resolution version without the color background so it can be printed and faxed without losing readability 

 

Each version of the Big Roll brochure file has two pages (with three panels each) for printing the front and the back side of the brochure into a two-sided brochure on 8.5-in. by 11-in. paper. 

 

For Laser Printers:   A- Print the following PDF page (the 3 front panels of the gate-fold brochure) B- Insert the printed page back into the printer—printed side up—and print the last PDF page (the 3 back panels of the brochure) C- Fold the resulting two-sided printed paper twice to form a brochure with the title “Big Roll Installation Guide” as the outside-front panel 

 

For Inkjet Printers—by design, Inkjet printers print the pages off-center, resulting in a narrow margins at one end of the paper and a wide margin at the other end.  To remedy this problem, follow these steps:  A- Print the following PDF page, trim the wide margin to match the width of the narrow margin at the page’s opposite end B- Place the trimmed printed page back into the printer—printed side up—and print the last PDF page C- Fold the resulting two-sided printed paper twice to form a brochure with the title “Big Roll Installation Guide” as the outside-front panel

Contact Us

Drop us a line!

Better yet, see us in person!

We love our customers, so feel free to visit during normal business hours.

Buena Vista Sod

300 Oak Trail, Suite 100, Garland, TX 75043, US

(972) 226-8873

Hours

Monday - Friday: 9am - 5pm

Saturday: By appointment

Sunday: Closed